Comfort

Issues pertaining to comfort in architecture have gained great importance in the last few decades because of their significant influence on people’s satisfaction and productivity and on the overall building energy management. Yet, despite numerous efforts in developing predictive models, human perception of comfort still poses important challenges during the design process, both at the research and professional levels.

Through human-centered experimentations and building performance simulations, LIPID contributes in the acquisition of new knowledge about the main environmental parameters that have an impact on comfort, with a major focus on thermal and visual factors.

In this way, the research provides new insights into suitable design strategies and models to support the design process in achieving a comfortable and sustainable built environment.

Indoor environment as a multi-sensory experience: visual and thermal factor interactions

G. Chinazzo; J. Wienold; M. Andersen

Light Symposium - Light and Architecture: Multi-sensory experiences, Stockholm, Sweden, 5-7 December 2018.

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The Effect of Coloured Glazing on Thermal, Visual and Overall Comfort Evaluation

G. Chinazzo; J. Wienold; M. Andersen

Proceedings of the International Colour Association (AIC) Conference 2018. 2018-09-26. AIC Interim Meeting -- colour & human comfort , Lisbon, Portugal , 25–29 September 2018.

Within the scope of a broader research project about visual and thermal interaction effects on human comfort and perception, the aim of this paper is to study the variation of thermal, visual and overall comfort votes of people exposed to blue and orange glazing. The study, conducted in a controlled test room and involving a total of 75 participants, is repeated at three temperature levels to investigate whether variations in comfort votes are affected by the thermal environment. Results show that participants changed their comfort votes for both thermal and overall comfort, beside the expected visual comfort, due to changes in glazing colour. Larger variations in thermal and overall comfort votes are observed in the close-to-comfortable temperature range (22 °C). Temperature-related effects can be seen for visual and thermal comfort evaluations. Overall comfort shows a positive correlation with both visual and thermal comfort.

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Combined effects of daylight transmitted through coloured glazing and indoor temperature on thermal responses and overall comfort

G. Chinazzo; J. Wienold; M. Andersen

Building and Environment. 2018-08-22. Vol. 144, p. 583-597.

DOI : 10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.08.045.

This study investigates the effect of daylight transmitted through three coloured glazing types (blue, orange and neutral) on thermal responses and overall comfort, at three temperature levels (19 °C, 22 °C and 26 °C). The goal is threefold: (i) understand whether the colour can affect a perception other than the visual (i.e., the thermal); (ii) study whether colour interacts with temperature influencing thermal responses; (iii) examine the combined effect of colour and temperature on overall comfort. A total of 75 participants took part in a controlled experiment. Thermal responses were estimated with questionnaires about subjective thermal estimation and physiological measurements (skin temperature, heart rate and skin conductance). Statistical analyses revealed that daylight transmitted through coloured glazing affected participants' thermal responses, mainly psychologically rather than physiologically, resulting in a colour-induced thermal estimation. With a blue glazing, people felt colder and less comfortable than with a neutral one. With an orange glazing, people felt warmer and more comfortable than with a blue one. Results were independent of temperature levels, but occurred mainly at temperatures perceived as comfortable (26 °C) or close-to-comfortable (22 °C). Overall comfort was also affected, both at the beginning of the colour exposure by only the glazing's colour, and at the end of the exposure by both colour and temperature. Given the significance of effects for the short exposure time and for temperature ranges that are realistic indoors, these findings should be taken into consideration in practice for both comfort and energy savings purposes, especially in transitional spaces.

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